California exempts Santa Cruz from emergency water restrictions

California’s Water Resources Control Authority has granted Santa Cruz an exemption from its newly approved emergency water use restrictions, the city announced Wednesday. State water. The state water board approved the measure on May 24 and took effect on June 10, and California also indicated that Santa Cruz relied on local water sources for its exemption. The city’s main water source is the Loch Lomond Reservoir. “Despite a mostly dry winter and spring, storms in October and December significantly improved storage in Loch Lomond. 25% – Santa Cruz Reservoir 90% full,” said Rosemary Maynard, the city’s water director. If California sees another dry rain season, Santa Cruz water officials said the current water stored in Loch Lomond will move the city over the next year if residents continue to use water efficiently. “This is something that has really become second nature to our customer base, which is really why we got an exception from the state this summer for not activating the Phase 2 response,” Kyle Petersen, director of customer service for the Santa Cruz Water Department, said. According to Petersen, the statewide target for water use is 55 gallons per day. Santa Cruz outperformed that figure at 45 gallons per day. In addition to a culture of conservation, Petersen cites the city’s infrastructure as one of the main reasons for Santa Cruz’s success. “We have had great success with the plumbing fixture modernization program. At the point of sale of any home, the fixture needs to be upgraded to efficient fixtures. I think these programs have been in place for twenty years, and that equates to the kind of savings over time,” Petersen said. While Santa Cruz is exempt from the procedures statewide, residents should watch their facelift. Outdoor watering is limited to two days a week and cannot take place between 10am-6pm Non-functional lawn irrigation is prohibited in the commercial, industrial and institutional sectors. Santa Cruz County has consistently ranked as one of the highest performing counties in California’s water conservation since 2015. In April 2022, residents across the county used an average of 54 gallons per capita per day.

The California Water Resources Control Authority has granted Santa Cruz an exemption from its newly approved emergency water use restrictions, the city announced Wednesday.

According to the city’s water department, current conservation measures exceed targets required under phase two of the state’s water shortage emergency plan.

The state water authority approved the measure on May 24 and it went into effect on June 10.

California also cited Santa Cruz’s reliance on local water sources as an exemption. The city’s main water source is the Loch Lomond Reservoir.

“Despite a mostly dry winter and spring, storms in October and December significantly improved storage in Loch Lomond. 25% – Santa Cruz Reservoir 90% full,” said Rosemary Maynard, the city’s water director.

If California sees another dry rain season, Santa Cruz water officials said the current water stored in Loch Lomond will move the city over the next year if residents continue to use water efficiently.

“This is something that has really become second nature to our customer base, which is really why we got an exception from the state this summer for not activating the Phase 2 response,” Kyle Petersen, director of customer service for the Santa Cruz Water Department, said.

According to Petersen, the statewide target for water use is 55 gallons per day. Santa Cruz outperformed that figure at 45 gallons per day.

In addition to a culture of conservation, Petersen cites the city’s infrastructure as one of the main reasons for Santa Cruz’s success.

“We have had great success with the plumbing fixture modernization program. At the point of sale of any home, the fixture needs to be upgraded to efficient fixtures. I think these programs have been in place for twenty years, and that equates to the kind of savings over time,” Petersen said.

While Santa Cruz is exempt from the procedures statewide, residents should watch their facelift. Outdoor watering is limited to two days a week and cannot take place between 10am-6pm Non-functional lawn irrigation is prohibited in the commercial, industrial and institutional sectors.

Santa Cruz County has been consistently ranked as One of the highest performing counties in water conservation in California since 2015. In April 2022, residents across the county used an average of 54 gallons per capita per day.

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